Digital DOWNLOAD Medieval Unicorn in Captivity Green Background Orenco Originals Counted Cross Stitch Chart / Pattern

by Orenco Originals

This chart was inspired by the artwork Of Vincent Van Gogh.

ABOUT THIS CHART:
This chart is created for 14 count fabric.
The finished size will be Size: 16 inches (224 stitches) by 16 inches (224 stitches).
For 39 DMC Cotton Floss colors.

This is a digitally transmitted file. You will not receive anything in the mail. If you want a printed chart in the mail see our listing for a physical chart.

THIS IS NOT A KIT NO FLOSS OR FABRIC IS INCLUDED.

Here is what you get in the digitally transmitted file that you will print:

• A single page (on 11 inch by 17 inch paper) charted graph with a reference key right at the top listing DMC floss or DMC Tapestry wools. You'll even find an exact number count of how many skeins of each floss/wool color you need.
• A tired eye charted graph which is printed on 4 pages of 11 inch by 17 inch paper that will help ease eye strain.
• A floss card for organizing your floss
• A color photo as a guide
• Instructions

This chart was inspired by a Medieval tapestry. Tapestries have been used since at least Hellenistic times. Samples of Greek tapestry have been found preserved in the desert of Tarim Basin dating from the 3rd century BC. Tapestry reached a new stage in Europe in the early 14th century AD. The first wave of production occurred in Germany and Switzerland. Over time, the craft expanded to France and the Netherlands. In the 14th and 15th centuries, Arras, France was a thriving textile town. The industry specialized in fine wool tapestries which were sold to decorate palaces and castles all over Europe. Few of these tapestries survived the French Revolution as hundreds were burnt to recover the gold thread that was often woven into them. Arras is still used to refer to a rich tapestry no matter where it was woven. By the 16th century, Flanders, Brussels, and Enghien had become the centers of European tapestry production. In the 17th century, Flemish tapestries demonstrating intricate detail of pattern and color embodied in intricate compositions, often of monumental scale. In the 19th century, William Morris resurrected the art of tapestry-making in the medieval style at Merton Abbey. Morris & Co. made successful series of tapestries for home and ecclesiastical uses, with figures based on drawings by Edward Burne-Jones. Kilims and Navajo rugs are also types of tapestry work.


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